Category: Schedule I

DEA Reaffirms Stance That CBD Meets Schedule I Criteria — Reality Says Otherwise

The US Drug Enforcement Administration has publicly reiterated its position that cannabidiol, a non-psychotropic cannabinoid, is properly categorized under federal law as a schedule I controlled substance — meaning that, by definition, it possesses “a high potential for abuse,” “no currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States,” and lacks “accepted safety … under medical supervision.”

DEA Reaffirms ‘Flat Earth’ Position With Regard To Marijuana Scheduling

The United States Drug Enforcement Administration has decided to reject a pair of administrative rescheduling petitions challenging the federal classification of cannabis as a Schedule I controlled substance with no accepted medical utility, according to advanced news reports published this evening by NPR, the New York Times, Reuters, and other news outlets.

It Is Time To Deschedule, Not Reschedule, Cannabis

A recent memorandum from the US Drug Enforcement Administration to several United States Senators indicates that the agency is prepared to respond in the coming months to a five-year-old petition seeking to amend the plant’s status as a schedule I prohibited substance. Under the US Controlled Substances Act of 1970, the cannabis plant and its organic cannabinoids are classified as schedule I prohibited substances — the most restrictive category available under the law. As summarized by the DEA, “Schedule I drugs are the most dangerous drugs of all the drug schedules with potentially severe psychological or physical dependence.” Explicitly, substances in this category must meet three specific inclusion criteria: The substance must possess “a high potential for abuse”; it must…

Read More

One Barrier to Cannabis Research Removed, Others Remain

It bears repeating that ample scientific research already exists to contradict cannabis’ federal, schedule I status as a substance without medical utility, lacking acceptable safety, and possessing a high potential of abuse. More clinical research is welcome, but unfortunately science has never driven marijuana policy. If it did, the United States would already have a very different policy in place.