Recruiting informants in college

This is just another of the despicable side-effects of the drug war.

Undercover students used in drug busts at some University of Wisconsin campuses

Yeah, you bust some college kid of selling pot to his friends, and threaten him with a felony, which would kick him out of school, unless he turns on his friends and buys drugs from them for the police.

Informants have a useful place in the criminal justice system, but this isn’t one of them.

“We don’t use the informants in a targeted, careful way of going after organized crime,” she says. “We use informants the way that a bad cook uses salt.”

Exactly.

Fortunately, this article brought up Rachel Hoffman.

Rachel Hoffman, a 23-year-old Florida State University graduate, was pressured in 2008 to be an informant after Tallahassee, Florida, police searched her apartment and found a small amount of marijuana and ecstasy. But the buy turned out to be an armed robbery, and the robbers killed Hoffman after discovering her recording device, says Lance Block, a Florida attorney. [...]

“The police are supposed to protect us from harm, not subject us to harm,” Block says. “And when law enforcement intentionally expose untrained civilians into these highly dangerous operations, they’re not protecting them from harm … It’s one thing to get information from people secretly and confidentially. It’s another thing to throw them to the wolves, like they did with Rachel.”

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