Life-saving medical marijuana?

Study: Medical pot might reduce drug overdose deaths

This is really going to piss off Kevin Sabet…

Access to medical marijuana appears to have saved thousands of lives over the past few years by reducing accidental overdose deaths from drugs like Vicodin, Percocet and OxyContin, a new study says.

States with legalized medical marijuana saw, on average, 1,700 fewer deaths a year from prescription drugs than they would have otherwise, says the study led by researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

Oh, wait. It already has…

Kevin Sabet, director of the Drug Policy Institute at the University of Florida College of Medicine, said he has many concerns about how the study’s authors collected and analyzed the data. He said they failed to differentiate between states with strict and lax medical marijuana laws, and didn’t examine emergency-room admission and prescription data, and failed to see what impact methadone clinics might have had. He said it’s hard to believe there was such an across-the-board reduction in predicted deaths.

“In today’s supercharged discussions, it could be easily misunderstood by people,” he said

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook Post to Reddit Post to StumbleUpon