Pot Smokers are smarter than Sophie Scott

Pot smokers still see it as harmless: study – By national medical reporter Sophie Scott

A national survey has found many people see cannabis as a soft drug, with nearly half underestimating the harmful impacts it may have.

May have? What does that mean? Cannabis may cause a shift in the space-time continuum. The fact that pot smokers underestimate the potential harmful effects that cannabis may have on the space-time continuum hardly seems dangerous. How can you possibly blame pot smokers for underestimating the harmful effects of hypotheticals?

A study of 1,000 Australians, by the Richmond Fellowship of New South Wales, found almost one-third admitted to using cannabis.

People aged 25 to 34 were the most likely to use cannabis and also the most likely to discount the harmful effects of the drug.

So which “harmful effects” did they discount? Inquiring minds want to know. National Medical Reporter Sophie Scott, however, does not have an enquiring mind.

Richmond Fellowship spokeswoman Pamela Rutledge says the findings reinforce many anecdotal views about cannabis and mental health.

“Anecdotally our workers see the terrible toll cannabis has on users on a day-to-day basis, particularly young users,” she said.

She says there is a long way to go to change attitudes that cannabis is a harmless drug.

So what is this major research facility that performed this important scientific study? I took a look at the Richmond Fellowship of New South Wales.

You probably won’t find the “study” anywhere on their web site (I couldn’t). You will learn, however, that they are a non-profit, heavily funded by the government, that provides treatment and recovery programs for mental illness.

So what does that have to do with pot smokers and underestimating dangers? Nothing really.

But you’ll also learn on the front page of their site that they’re about to host a special symposium, and they were probably hoping that they could get National Medical Reporter Sophie Scott to shill for them.

CANNABIS AND MENTAL ILLNESS: WHAT DO WE KNOW AND WHAT CAN BE DONE? [...]

The Symposium will include a panel of experts and will be moderated by the ABC’s Quentin Dempster.

The RFNSW’s experience in working with young people has provided strong anecdotal evidence of the social, emotional and economic impacts of cannabis-induced mental illness.

How dare pot smokers underestimate the anecdotal evidence that may exist?

What anecdotal evidence exists regarding mental illness and National Medical Reporters?

[Thanks, swansong]

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