Torture and drug policy

“We don’t torture people in America and people who say we do simply know nothing about our country.”

- George W. Bush [Interview with Australian TV - 10/18/03]

At the recent GOP Presidential candidate debate on Fox, the five participants were asked to raise their hands if they could support the use of torture – specifically waterboarding. Three raised their hands. The two that didn’t were Ron Paul and Gary Johnson, and those are the ones who support ending the drug war.

Coincidence? I think not.

I believe that this is just one more example that illustrates a frightening trend in the political arena today that tends to reward:

  1. A pathologically disturbed psychological profile,
  2. A lack of knowledge or interest in how the world actually works,
  3. A willingness to sacrifice any principles related to morality or liberty in order to toss out red meat to stir up the masses, or
  4. Some combination of the above.

 



 

Who Would You Choose?

I torture people.

There are a lot of techniques that I use to disorient my victims, but then comes my favorite. I drown them. Slowly. Painfully. Make no mistake about it, they are drowning. They are suffocating and would die if I didn’t stop at just the right moment. This isn’t merely temporary pain like cutting off a finger or taking a drill to their teeth without novocaine. No, this is a slow and agonizing death. And then I bring them back and kill them again.

I am aware that this is illegal under both U.S. and International law.


I grow plants.

After germinating and creating seedlings, I make sure I’ve got good pH-balanced soil, warm temperatures, lots of light, and just the right amount of water and nutrients. I do some topping and pinching to encourage growth and then remove the male plants to insure maximum value of remaining plants. These plants are useful in thousands of ways and also provide a pleasant and safe recreational value. I share some of them with my adult friends at their request.

I am aware that this is illegal under both U.S. and International law.


In a country that prides itself on liberty, justice, and the rule of law, which person is more likely to be sent to prison?

Which one should be more likely to be sent to prison?

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